As a crew for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers worked to clear buried munitions from the Fort Glenn Formerly Used Defense Site on Umnak Island in the summer of 2020, it unexpectedly discovered a 500-pound bomb. The following year, the team returned to the project site in remote Alaska with a remote-controlled excavator to safely neutralize the explosive device along with three others of the same size. (U.S. Army Photo)
Kim Kyong-ho, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District Geotechnical Branch chemist, analyzes an asbestos sample collected from an U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan-Casey building through a microscope. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, asbestos was used in many types of home building products and insulation materials until the 1970s. (U.S. Army photo by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District)
FORT SHAFTER, Hawaii – Members of the Mississippi River Commission pictured at the Pacific Ocean Division Headquarters commenced the 2022 Mekong-Mississippi Sister Rivers Exchange engagement starting with a prep session in Hawaii on July 6, with U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, U.S. Army Pacific, and the Asia Pacific Center of Security Studies. Delegation members include Brig. Gen. Kirk Gibbs (center-right), Pacific Ocean Division commanding general, located at Fort Shafter, Hawaii, and Mississippi River Commission members: Maj. Gen. Diana M. Holland (center-left), commanding general of Mississippi Valley Division located in Vicksburg, Mississippi and Mississippi River Commission president, Norma Jean Mattei (second to left), Ph.D., professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of New Orleans, Col. Geoff Van Epps (far-left), commander of the Northwestern Division, located in Portland, Oregon, Rear Adm. Benjamin Evans (second to right), director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office of Coast Survey, located in Silver Spring, Maryland, and Col. Andy Pannier (far right), deputy commander, Mississippi Valley Division, located in Vicksburg, Mississippi.
The Kyogamisaki Communications Site sits on the scenic cliffs of Japan’s western coast. Sandwiched between the ocean and the mountains, the site commands a strategic location facilitating the early warning of threats from nations in the region who would seek to do America and Japan harm.
Nathan Epps, acting deputy chief for the Engineering, Construction and Operations Division, stresses the importance of triangles while testing the load capacity of a student’s bridge design with a toy car on Feb. 22 at Clark Middle School in Anchorage. A team from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District spoke with an applied technology class at the school during National Engineers Week to encourage students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math. (U.S. Army photo by Rachel Napolitan)

Public Notices

Alaska District Public Notices

View the Public Notices published by the Alaska District Regulatory Division within the last several months. read more ...

Honolulu District Public Notices

View the Regulatory/Permit Actions published by the Honolulu District.

 

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News

Workforce Recruitment Program internship proves talent comes in many forms
9/6/2022
At the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Far East District (FED), efforts to diversify the workforce are strengthened through the Workforce Recruitment Program...
Far East District’s experts regulate asbestos to protect environment and USFK personnel
9/2/2022
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District (FED) Environmental Section has two accredited environmental laboratories: a chemistry laboratory and an asbestos laboratory. The chemistry...
Army engineers remove World War II-era explosives from national historic landmark on a remote Alaskan island
8/31/2022
Boom! Another explosion went off as a field crew for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District worked to safely clear and detonate munitions remaining from the World War II-era Fort Glenn, an...
Army engineers partner for 25 years with federal biologists to study duck nesting ecology in Alaska
8/23/2022
The whistling sound of beating wings moves through the forest as a common goldeneye duck lands in a nest box mounted to the side of a tree near the Moose Creek Dam in North Pole, Alaska. Focused on...
Far East District welcomes Col. Levy as its 38th commander
7/21/2022
USAG Humphreys, Republic of Korea – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Far East District (FED) conducted a change of command ceremony during which Col. Christopher W. Crary relinquished command...

Around the Division

Justina Chang, Far East District Workforce Recruitment Program intern, poses for a photo at her workstation in the Customer Service Branch of the Information Management Office, located in the headquarters building. The Workforce Recruitment Program, or WRP, is a national recruitment program that helps federal sector employers hire college students and recent graduates with disabilities for temporary or permanent positions. (Courtesy photo)
Justina Chang (left), Far East District Workforce Recruitment Program intern, stands with Johnny Howard (right), Information Management Office chief, during her farewell luncheon at the headquarters building, Aug. 12. The Workforce Recruitment Program, or WRP, is a national recruitment program that helps federal sector employers hire college students and recent graduates with disabilities for temporary or permanent positions. (Courtesy photo)
Kim Kyong-ho, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District Geotechnical Branch chemist, takes a suspected asbestos sample from the gasket used for the duck system in Gwangju Air Base, June 2002. In FED’s asbestos lab, experts analyze asbestos building materials and air samples for worker protection and environmental indoor air quality. (U.S. Army photo by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District)
Kim Kyong-ho, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District Geotechnical Branch chemist, reviews samples in the branch’s state-of-the-art chemistry lab. In FED’s asbestos lab, experts analyze asbestos building materials and air samples for worker protection and environmental indoor air quality. (U.S. Army photo by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District)
Kim Kyong-ho, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District Geotechnical Branch chemist, analyzes an asbestos sample collected from an U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan-Casey building through a microscope. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, asbestos was used in many types of home building products and insulation materials until the 1970s. (U.S. Army photo by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Alaska District and Range Support Center collaborated to remove unexploded ordnance from 337 acres of land in 2020 and 2021 at the Fort Glenn Formerly Used Defense Site on Umnak Island in Alaska. The environmental restoration project is the first in the state to be funded by the DoD Military Munitions Response Program. (U.S. Army Photo)
To find unexploded ordnance from the Fort Glenn Formerly Used Defense Site, a field crew for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers initially conducted methodical surface sweeps of the land on Umnak Island in Alaska. Workers then used hand tools to extract munitions from the soil for consolidation into piles that were safely destroyed. For larger objects that were too dangerous to remove by hand, the team conducted detonations in place before removing remnants and debris. (U.S. Army Photo)
In 2008, the eruption of Mount Okmok generated a volcanic mudflow that covered a 70-acre portion of the Fort Glenn Formerly Used Defense Site on Umnak Island in Alaska. A field crew for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers found that this lahar layer varied in depth from a few inches to as much as 4 feet in some areas during the process of removing unexploded ordnance from the site in 2020 and 2021. This issue required the team to excavate wider and deeper to ensure all munitions were safely recovered from the soil. (U.S. Army Photo)
A field crew for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers placed recovered military munitions in trenches at the Fort Glenn Formerly Used Defense Site on Umnak Island in Alaska. Technicians used controlled explosions to safely dispose of the consolidated piles of ordnance. (U.S. Army Photo)
As a crew for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers worked to clear buried munitions from the Fort Glenn Formerly Used Defense Site on Umnak Island in the summer of 2020, it unexpectedly discovered a 500-pound bomb. The following year, the team returned to the project site in remote Alaska with a remote-controlled excavator to safely neutralize the explosive device along with three others of the same size. (U.S. Army Photo)

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